Thoughts on Arranging

Consistency in creative efforts requires the gradual and disciplined build-up of habits that make you do certain actions on a consistent basis. By doing something every day, you are somehow able to invite creativity in your life daily. Recently I’ve been trying to learn new things in terms of music creation in order to expand and improve.

I’ve been working specifically on arranging and how to turn your regular 8-bar loop into a full-fledged song. The more I dive into it, the more I realize that many people (including myself) can get stuck in the 8-bar loop. Coming up with strategies to overcome this is crucial. Through my own experience, and the suggestion of more experienced producers, I realized that the key to this is making your 8 bar loop as full and complete as possible. With this complete 8 bar loop you can now create a big “block” of sound by repeating this sequence for the duration you’d like. Go ahead and copy paste this 8 bar loop until you hit the 6 minute mark.

8 Bar Loop

From there, you can do “subtractive” arranging. “You are like a sculptor chopping away at the woodblock to create a work of art.” Thomas Hoffknecht mentions this in his masterclass. I can relate this to an assemblage artist: finding small fragments of materials as they come to the shore of your “mind”, then you put it together to form an entirely new piece.

8 bar loop, extended to 6 mins in length

This was enlightening as it organizes the creative process by making the artist/producer focus on one thing at a time. The production and “raw material gathering” is where one deals with recording a performance, sound design, programming, and etc. (Steve Roach compares this to the shooting phase in making a film) After one is able to shoot interesting “scenes” and you have all the footage you need, you can proceed to editing the film. Going back to music – arranging.

Sound sculpture

I’m hoping this will translate to more finished works.

Creativity with Scarcity

The past few days have forced me to milk the little time that I have for art. I decided to challenge myself and see how long it would take me from zero to full fledged piece of art, ready to be shared to world.

To share a song in the internet world, the very basic things you need would be the audio master, and cover art to go with it. I took out my iPhone, pressed the start button, and proceeded to go to my Korg Electribe to start making a track. I wanted to time it to see how long it actually takes.

Composing

I wanted to see what an Electribe can do for rock grooves or “rock idioms” as I would call it. So immediately I was up and running with some basic rock drums. I quickly selected a kick and snare and set the tempo to 170. Immediately I was off and running! Some punky rhythm to start with.

After that I decided to do a bass line, taking a bass sound from one of the samples found in the Electribe. (Here was another challenge, I would confine myself to the sounds of the Electribe and will only customize it when I finish the first batch of 250 patterns) I did not want to get bogged down by the act of endlessly looking for the best damn bass sound. I needed to decide right there and then, and decide quickly. Moment I found it I switched on the keyboard mode and start making basic melodies.

Korg Electribe Sampler – A standalone groovebox

Next up I went for the lead riff and was going for some guitar sounds but got derailed and I ended up picking this weird sounding synth. Ok, I’ll accept it, it sounds alright to me. Whats important is I was moving forward and I was still liking the track somehow and grooving to it.

On and on I put one layer after the other until I went for this vocal chop “go”. This was when I thought “ok its time to dial back and go for the break down of the track. Lets bring this baby home.” I sequenced an alternative pattern to serve as the “B” section and ended the composing there.

Recording

So with that, I had the elements I needed to make an arrangement that I could perform and record with the Zoom H1. I will take the stereo out of the Electribe and plug this to the line-in of the Zoom H1. I recorded the whole thing in one take, trusting my gut, trusting that my intentions will bring me to the end result – a finished track that sums up my day.

I hit record and press play on my Electribe. Im up and running at 170 bpm. A pretty frantic pace for some electronic “rock” music. I start going through the patterns and went for some improvised pitch shifts and drums. Some off timing some choked by the note stealing limitation of the sampler. Still I push on, and go into the next pattern of the song and I finally arrive at the GO part which I know will lead me to the “turn around” of the song.

At this point, I’m not thinking of much – I’m just focused on the music and what will happen next. I know that the record button is on and everything is getting captured. With this in mind, I also try to stay in the spirit of the music and just keep on going. I try not to get derailed by imperfections, and get bogged down by mistakes.

And finally I find myself “heading home”. I’m now in the patterns that will bring me back to the beginning of my track, to end the instrumental. This is electronic music.. but with a human element. Live arranging, live jamming, “DAWLESS” so to speak. Just me and the machine.

The final sequences of the drums come in and all is well. A mistake here and there but its okay. I hit the stop button, and boom another track made. I looked at the time and I had just spent 45 minutes. Not bad! This is a song from scratch!

Mastering

I proceed to fire up my laptop and open up Ableton Live. I transfer the track from the H1 via usb and proceed to setting up my mastering session. I had recently built my little humble mastering chain (which I can talk about in the future) and start fiddling with parameters. I also do some gain staging to make sure that the plug-ins are all in the sweet spot. Another 30 minutes go by and I finally finish the track! Ready for uploading, ready (or not) for sharing.

Cover Art

I feel the slight fatigue but I push on. I open up GIMP and start working on the artwork. I wanted to keep it simple. I saw a crack on my bedroom wall and decided right there and then that it could be part of the artwork. I took a picture with my trusty X-A10 and upload the picture to my laptop. With GIMP I proceed to make the artwork and since I’m such a beginner with the software I ended up spending a RIDICULOUS amount of time trouble shooting! It was not a very pleasant experience but I finally figured it out.. So many errors but it’s okay – I learned.

Spontaneous usage of details in your environment

Conclusion

So the total time I spend to make this project was 2 hours and 46 minutes. Not bad if you think about it. For sure this can still be streamlined and fine-tuned. It was just great knowing that I could come up something complete in that time-span.

I wanted to include the uploading to the platforms in the process but it was simply too late. I did not want to end up sleeping at 5am.

Overall it was a well spent 2 hours and 46 minutes. It will not go to waste as long as I upload it and share it as well. It’s interesting to know that if I have a 3 hour time block, I can come up with something. On a side note, the best place for your music is a place where someone can discover it and listen to it. No way will it ever be heard in your hard drive.

So here it is, a quick rock based electronic music jam. I would say its like an encapsulated record of my day presented in a sequence of sounds. Let me know what you guys think.